Album Review: Kulick’s ‘Yelling in a Quiet Neighborhood’ is a journey through love, loss and yearning

Kulick’s rise from opening act to commanding attention has been a slow, welcome burn into our lines of vision. With the release of debut album Yelling in a Quiet Neighborhood, singer-songwriter Jacob Kulick has transformed relatable feelings into a beautifully interwoven collection of songs that can speak to us all. 

The category is: love, loss, hope, despair, yearning. Losing something- whether it’s a person, a relationship or any other facet of life- can pull out the most negative aspects of our emotions. For Kulick, this loss was profound and the feelings bleed from these songs. From wanting to crawl back to this person, reaching the end of his rope and coping with loneliness, Kulick explores an entire spectrum on this album.

2020 has not been an easy year in so many ways. We’re all searching for a silver lining; a sliver of hope in an ever-changing darkness. Yelling in a Quiet Neighborhood offers an opportunity for cathartic release. Listeners don’t need to avoid their emotions; instead, they can give into them and find their own peace. 

This album is meant to be played loudly, preferably in a packed room shouting together in a beautiful exchange of group energy. Kulick has been playing many of these songs over the last few tours, but with COVID postponing live events for the foreseeable future, fans will have to be content with memorizing all of their favorites before returning to fill venues with their voices.

Neighborhood is not a cheerful album, but it’s one that listeners will be able to find themselves in, regardless of which stage they are within their own loss or recovery. Kulick reaches new musical heights and dives deep into an ocean of emotions. You’ll want to listen to this entire album on repeat and, with everything going on, it couldn’t have come at a more appropriate time. 

 

Story by Olivia Khiel
Image courtesy of Kulick

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